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‘Come to Surgery, Echo’

“You need to come do some surgeries,” said Dr. Simon, a while back. Echo smiled. End of conversation. “You need to do surgeries and show our team how it’s done,” said Dr. Simon, another day.   ...

From Spiritual Death to Life, Then Physical Death to Life—All in a Month

Death touches us all. But when a parent dies, we sense our own mortality. We sense our own passing of earthly time. And we grieve. Oh, yes, we do. Not like those who do not have the hope of Jesus, though. And that’s Mandla Kunene’s ...

Room 6: Surgical Procedures Performed Free for Patients

Room 6 is the surgical wing of The Luke Commission. Whether it’s set up bed-by-bed, instrument-by-instrument in a classroom at rural outreaches, in the corner of a vehicle warehouse on the Miracle Campus, or at the far end of the Specialized Ca...

It’s Raining, It’s Pouring

What happens at Luke Commission outreaches when the heavens open and pour out rain? Nothing, much. Everything goes on as usual, although patients and staff alike may be wet, the smells inside may be more pungent than usual, and everyone wades thro...

Celumusa Meets Siyabonga, and They Meet Us

Two young men living above their disabilities met at a Luke Commission outreach recently. One was a patient; the other was an exuberant, ever-smiling staff member.   Celumusa talks to Siyabonga about his new mobility...

Walking Sticks Keep Elderly Swazis Mobile­­­­—and Grateful

Usually The Luke Commission provides canes from Free Wheelchair Mission and Hope and Healing International one patient at a time. However, during the latest CARES (Comprehensive and Restorative Eyecare Services) surgical session, many elderly pati...

When Leaders Stand Up

Easter may well be the most celebrated holiday in Eswatini.  In recognition of Swazi culture and, more importantly, in remembering Christ’s death and resurrection, The Luke Commission staff are given extra days off to attend “camp...

Five Years Can Be a Full Lifetime—Emphasis on Full

He grimaces when his mother lifts him from lying down to sitting up. But the painful expression quickly becomes a grin. A beam of victory to those of us who watch and ask his story. Fisokwethu is five years old and has an incurable brain tumor. Hi...

Listen to Their Stories! They See Today!

It grew dark during the first service at the Specialized Care and Surgery Centre a few months ago. It grew dark, because night set in, and the centre-under-construction was still just a shell of a building.   However, night had already set in...

Running Scared, Running for His Life

(The staff member in this piece freely invited us to share his story. We have changed his name to ensure his privacy at The Miracle Campus.) When a staff member comes to work intoxicated, more may be behind his behavior than inappropriate drinking...

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