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Travel Journal

 Greetings from Swaziland on a Wednesday morning in early spring.

We thought you might enjoy a brief update. We have seen God move in marvelous ways, such that we can only process bits and pieces. But, oh, the bits and pieces thrill our hearts. We've seen about 2300 patients in 5 different location out in the bush. After each all-day clinic we've shown The Passion of the Christ. One night 73 were saved. Another night none appeared to accept Jesus, but the Gospel went forth that day, too.

Each patient is prayed with before being seen by the medical teal Harry, Echo, January, and Karey. They're given a booklet in SiSwati at the pharmacy when they receive their medicine. Some additional 400 Swazis who need prescription eyeglasses have been diagnosed and fitted, plus another 400 reading glasses given. Oh how excited the people are to see again!

January treated a severe burn case, where a 10 year old boy had fallen into a cooking fire a week ago. The sink on most of his leg was gone or charred black. He barely winced as January and Karey treated him. That evening we took him to the hospital where he went to surgery that evening. The Luke Commission will pay his hospital bill.

Karey saw another burn patient yesterday up in the mountains 120 km from here in Manzini. Her leg was burned 7 months ago. It was still raw and infected. When we returned to the same school today to give clothes to AIDS orphans, we will bring the girl back with us and care for her.

On Kalvin's birthday 2 days ago, we showed The Passion to hundreds of schoolkids after they were dismissed at 2 PM. When the movie ended, most students dashed out the door because they had to walk long distances before dark. However, a group of 40 stayed and responded to Pastor Joseph's invitation to receive Christ.

Kal and I couldn't believe our eyes as we watched the Holy Spirit move. It was the greatest birthday present ever. The children are doing well, although we've weathered a few close calls, and are dirtier at the end of each day than they have ever been before. We all fight dysentery-like problems, but it is a small price to pay.

We surely appreciate the prayers from each of you. We feel God's protection time and time again. Please continue to pray, dear ones. The medicine costs are enormous, but we trust God will supply and move others to help.

Echo bought 2 used cars that pull 2 trailers full of medicine, glasses, clothes, and equipment. However, we really need 3 cars. Besides all of us, we are transporting 15 translators every day. Please pray for our safety on the roads and that the cars will hold up. Echo has been busy keeping everything going and solving problems. One day she was called to meet with the Swaziland Minister of Health. It was a difficult meeting, but God covered us with His blessings in the end.

We visit the hospital every morning giving out new clothes to the new moms and sick babies with tracts for everyone. Tim and Jaden and Jake just returned from the hospital with Kal and me. Tim has used his electrician abilities in several areas and loves being here.

Joe is our driver, trailer organizer, and logistics man. Amanda does face painting and makes salvation bracelets with the school children, as well as fits eyeglasses. Grace is our prescription eyeglass expert. Everyone is working harder than they have ever worked and know they are blessed to do so.

Love in Jesus,
Jan

Copyright 2019 by The Luke Commission